Avionics Training, by Len Buckwalter

Avionics Training

by Len Buckwalter

Publisher:
ISBN-13:
9781885544216
Copyright Date:
2012
Edition:
2nd
Pages:
278
Binding:
Paperback
Weight:
2.7lbs
PURCHASE OPTIONS
Book
add to cart
$83.95

Primary textbook for the avionics technician includes systems, installation, troubleshooting, harness construction and repair, and basic wiring skills

Avionics Training is the first book to explain avionics in simple terms, with over 400 illustrations in full color. It assumes no knowledge of electronics, uses no math, formulas or confusing abbreviations. The book explains the operation of 30 systems, how they relate to each other, how they're installed and troubleshooting techniques. This is a hands-on book that replaces theory with "hands-on" information. There are chapters on mounting instruments, preparing wires and connectors, running cables, installing antennas and other practical techniques.

The book not only covers conventional avionics of the last 50 years, but the most recent technology, such as GPS, satellite communications, collision avoidance, the new transponders and electronic flight instruments (EFIS). "Avionics Training" was written because of new directions in the avionics industry. The demand today is for people with a "systems" understanding---which is required to find problems and replace faulty "black boxes." This is in contrast to people skilled in circuit theory who repair small components inside the box. The need for such skills is disappearing because the new computerized avionics must be sent back to the manufacturer for repair. The result is increasing demand for troubleshooting on the airplane while it's on the flightline, especially as more electronics spread through almost every on-board system.

Already adopted as a text by teaching institutions, this book is recommended for any type of aviation technician, pilots, newcomers entering the avionics field, and marketing and manufacturing personnel needing a broader knowledge of the avionics industry.

The second part of this book details best shop practices for avionics technicians including wiring, stripping, crimping, splicing, harnessing, the use of various connectors and coaxial cable, grounding and more.


TABLE OF CONTENTS:

  • Section 1: Systems
    • The Meaning of Avionics
      • first instrument panel
      • blind flying
      • all-glass cockpit
    • A Brief History
      • sperry gyroscope
      • turn and bank
      • Morse, Bell, and Hertz
      • first aircraft radio
      • lighted airways
      • beginning of instrument flight
    • VHF Com
      • acceptable VHF com radio
      • data radio
      • navcom connections
      • VHF systems
      • Com control panel
      • Com LRU
      • splitting VHF channels
    • HF Com (High Frequency Communications)
      • HF control display
      • HF system
      • single sideband
      • line replaceable units
      • HF datalink
      • control panel (airline)
      • HF transceiver
      • antenna coupler
      • HF antenna mounting
    • Satellite Communications
      • Inmarsat
      • aero system
      • space segment
      • cell phones
      • ground Earth station
      • aircraft Earth Station
      • Satcom antennas for aircraft
      • steered Antennas
      • high speed data
      • aero services
    • ACARS (communication addressing & reporting system)
      • messages and format
      • ACARS bands and frequencies
    • Selcal (selective calling)
      • controller, decoder
      • how selcal code is generated
      • ground network
      • Selcal airborne system
    • ELT (Emergency Locator Transmitter)
      • search & rescue
      • ELT components
      • 406 MHz
      • 406 ELT system
      • fleet operation
      • Cospas-Sarsat
    • VOR (VHF omnidirectional range)
      • coverage
      • VOR phase
      • VOR signal Structure
      • subcarrier
      • VOR receiver
      • navigation
      • horizontal situation indicator
      • radio magnetic indicator
      • Nav control display
    • ILS (instrument landing system)
      • ILS components and categories
      • approach lighting
      • flight inspection and monitoring
      • ILS signals
      • glideslope receiver
      • marker beacon receiver and ground station
    • MLS (microwave landing system)
      • azimouth beam
      • elevation beam
      • time reference
      • multimode receiver
    • ADF (Automatic Direction Finder)
      • radio magnetic indicator
      • sense
      • ADF system
      • NDB (non directional radio beacon)
      • control display (airline)
      • line replaceable unit (airline)
      • digital ADF
      • EFIS display
    • DME (Distance Measuring Equipment)
      • obtaining distance
      • DME "jitter" for identification
      • EFIS display for DMR
      • airborne & ground stations
      • channels X and Y
    • Transponder
      • control display
      • transponder interrogator
      • ATCRBS and mode S
      • airline control display
      • line replaceable unit
      • mode S interrogation and replies
    • Radar Altimeter
      • antennas
      • operation
    • GPS/SatNav
      • GPS constellation
      • frequencies
      • SatNav services
      • time difference measurement
      • finding position
      • the satellite signal
      • WAAS wide area augmentation system
      • second frequency for civil aviation
      • LAAS local area augmentation
      • RAIM receiver autonomous integrity monitoring
      • Galileo constellation
    • EFIS (Electronic Flight Instrument System)
      • three screen EFIS
      • EFIS architecture
      • multifunction display
      • EFIS on the B-747
      • Airbus A-320 Flight Deck
    • Cockpit Voice and Data Recorder
      • CVR basics
      • underwater locating device
      • CVR interconnect
      • solid state and stored information
    • Weather Detection
      • radar color coding
      • types of detection
      • radar transmitter/receiver
      • weather radar control panel
      • lightning detection
      • radar antenna
      • datalink
      • radomes
      • windshear
      • satellite downlink
    • TCAS (Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance)
      • basic operation
      • traffic and resolution advisories
      • TCAS I and II
      • coordinating climb and descent
      • TCAS components
      • whisper-shout
      • directional interrogation
      • TCAS III
      • voice warnings
  • Section 2: Installation
    • Planning the Installation
      • replacing steam gauges
      • required instruments and radios
      • instrument layout
      • large aircraft EFIS
      • manuals and diagrams
      • installation drawings
      • connectors and PIN numbers
      • schematic symbols
      • viewing angle
      • navcom connections
    • Electrical Systems
      • AC and DC power
      • DC systems
      • airline electrical systems
      • switches
      • lighted pushbutton
      • circuit breaker and fuses
    • Mounting Avionics
      • new or old installation
      • hostile areas
      • selecting metal
      • cutting holes
      • avionics bay
      • airlines ARINC MCU case sizes
      • ATR case sizes
      • electrostatic discharge
      • cooling
      • panel mounted radios
      • airline mounting
      • locking systems
      • indexing pins
      • integrated avionics
      • instrument mounting
    • Connectors
      • typical connectors
      • RF conectors
      • identifying conector contacts
      • coaxial connectors
      • ARINC connectors
      • crimping contacts
      • releasing connector pins
      • shrink tubing
      • safety wire connectors
      • attachning coaxial connectors
    • Wiring the Airplane
      • swamp
      • high risk areas
      • selecting wire
      • wire and cable types
      • wire stripping
      • nicked and broken wires
      • splicing wires
      • ring terminals
      • terminal strips
      • harnessing the wire bundle
      • chafing and abrasion
      • clamping
      • grounding to the airframe
      • service loops
    • Aviation Bands and Frequencies
      • radio frequency bands
      • Higher bands
      • low frequencies
      • skipping through the ionosphere
      • High and Very High Frequencies
      • L-band
      • from Hertz to Gigahertz
      • line of sight communications
      • control and display of bands and frequencies
    • Antenna Installation
      • antennas for airlines, corporate, and military aircraft
      • how to read antenna spec sheets
      • antennas for light aircraft
      • airline antenna locations
      • antenna types
      • location
      • bonding antennas to the airframe
      • antenna mounting
      • antenna couplers
      • base station and mobile antennas
      • GPS antennas
    • Panel Labels and Abbreviations
      • silk screen, engraving, tape
      • panel abbreviations
  • Section 3
    • Test and Troubleshooting
      • ADF
      • Antennas
      • Antenna VSWR
      • Autopilots
      • Comm Tranceivers
      • DME
      • ELT
      • Glideslope Receiver
      • Lightning Strikes
      • Software Loading
      • Transponders
      • VOR
      • Wiring and Connectors
      • Fault Detection Device (wiring)
      • Precipitation Static
      • Avionics Checklist

About the Author:
Len Buckwalter has been in the avionics industry for 30 years, having written 25 books and over 2,000 articles. He founded Avionics Magazine and served as Publisher and Editor for 17 years. He operated an FAA-certificated avionics shop in Leesburg, VA and is presently Publisher of Avionics Library. A graduate of New York University, he served in the U.S. Signal Corps as Communications Chief of an air-ground signal battalion, constructing and operating communications systems. He is an instrument-rated pilot with 3000 flight hours and attends avionics conferences in the airline and General Aviation fields. Len Buckwalter has been in the avionics industry for 30 years, having written 25 books and over 2,000 articles. He founded Avionics Magazine and served as Publisher and Editor for 17 years. He operated an FAA-certificated avionics shop in Leesburg, VA and is presently Publisher of Avionics Library. A graduate of New York University, he served in the U.S. Signal Corps as Communications Chief of an air-ground signal battalion, constructing and operating communications systems. He is an instrument-rated pilot with 3000 flight hours and attends avionics conferences in the airline and General Aviation fields.

PRODUCT REVIEWS:

No rating yet... Be the first to rate this product!